Re-classifications and Re-weighs for Freight Shipping

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

When do re-classifications and re-weighs occur?

Re-classifications and re-weighs occur when a shipment’s density or weight is miscalculated during the quoting process and, upon inspection by the carrier, it is revealed that the shipment is either a different class and/or weight than what was calculated and stated on the BOL.

Carriers inspect every piece of freight that comes through their terminals with exceptionally well calibrated and functioning dimension readers and scales. When what is stated on the BOL does not match their findings, re-classifications and/or re-weighs occur, resulting in the original price quote being invalidated and a new freight charge being put into place. Re-classifications and re-weighs can result in charges for a shipment going up either a small amount or a large amount depending on how incorrect the original quoted classification or weight was.

Say a shipment was quoted and shipped as a Class 175, but upon inspection is found to actually be Class 250. This would cause charges to increase by several hundred dollars; whereas a shipment quoted and moved initially as a Class 70 but upon inspection is found to be a Class 85 can result in charges only going up a small amount.

By the same token, a shipment that upon inspection is found to have the correct density but an incorrect weight will result in a re-weigh. Re-weighs are often not as serious as a re-class provided that the new, corrected weight does not change the classification of the freight. However, if the weight is found to be far more than what was originally stated, even in spite of the class remaining the same, the price can go up. We will explore this further in the examples listed below.

Examples of Re-classifications 

  1. Dimensions of 40L x 48W x 75H with a weight of 850lbs, resulting in a density of 10.20 and a classification of 92.0. However, upon inspection by the carrier, the shipment is found to be 42L x 49W x 82H with a weight of 850lbs, resulting in a corrected density of 8.70 and a corrected classification of 100. In this instance, a small change in price from the carrier may occur or if a FAK (Freight All Kinds) is in place, no change would occur.
  2. Dimensions of 40L x 48W x 75H with a weight of 400lbs, resulting in a density of 4.80 and a classification of 175. However, upon inspection by the carrier, the shipment is found to be 42L x 49W x 82H with a corrected weight of 325lbs, resulting in a corrected density of 3.32 and a corrected classification of 250. In this instance, a change in the price of several hundred dollars from the carrier would be the result.

Examples of Re-weighs

  1. A shipment of two pallets, both having dimensions of 40 x 48 x 48 and a total combined weight of 1,365lbs, resulting in a density of 12.79 and a classification of 85. However, upon inspection by the carrier, the shipment is found to actually weigh 1,590lbs. While this will not change the class (new density of 14.90), the price of the shipment would tick up due to an increased weight.
  2. A shipment of two pallets, both having dimensions of 40 x 48 x 48 and a total combined weight of 1,000lbs, resulting in a density of 9.37 and a classification of 100. However, upon inspection by the carrier, the shipment is found to actually weigh 825lbs, resulting in a corrected density of 7.73 and a corrected class of 125. This would be an instance where the dimensions do not change but due to the change in weight, it causes the classification to jump a class and causing the price to increase.

What if the carrier is “wrong”?

If a shipment has been reweighed or reclassified and you believe the carrier’s findings to be in error, it is possible for Ship Customer Support to file a dispute on your behalf. However, in order for Ship to be able to justify the time and resources that it takes to conduct a formal dispute with a carrier, they will require absolute rock solid proof in order to do so.

Items needed to dispute carrier findings

In addition to items easily obtainable by your account representative via their own resources, there are several items that they will need for you to provide for them in order for the dispute to have a chance for the carrier’s findings to be reversed. Items such as…

  1. Shipping tickets and invoices included in the shipment.
  2. Proof of the commodity being shipped.
  3. Photographs of the shipment being measured, notated measurements of the shipment as well as photographs of the scale showing the weight of the shipment and notations of those weights.
  4. Photographs of the freight shipped and the items themselves as well as photos of any catalog pages (either print or online) that you might be able to provide.
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Contact us

Drop your information in our handy form, including a brief message of what you’re looking for, and one of our sales experts will get back to you as soon as possible!

Headquarters

3739 N Steele Blvd,
Ste 220
Fayetteville, AR 72703
479-385-7472

Seattle Office

1700 Seventh Ave,
Ste 2100
Seattle, WA 98101